What’s on Stage? T&T’s Year-End Theatre Events

The theater scene in T&T is extremely diverse and can be found in little pockets all over the island. Student productions, theater company productions, play readings and workshops – there’s a lot happening. Keep up, though because all you need to do is blink – and you’ve missed it!

DCFA’s New Director’s Forum: Festival of Plays

The Department of Creative and Festival Art’s (DCFA) at the University of the West Indies holds an annual Festival of Plays, showcasing plays directed by students pursuing their degree in Theatre Arts. This year the festival will be held between 23-25 November 2018 and will feature six plays.

Each student prepares their production from the ground, up as part of their Directing II course at the University. They are given full freedom to innovate and mold the play as they see fit, with the guidance of tutors and lecturers at the University. The public is welcome to come and view the final pieces, which are in fact part of the student’s assessment! It is truly a refreshing experience, seeing the newest emerging talent in directing and acting in T&T.

If you’re interested in attending, tickets are available for purchase on the night, at the Learning Resource Centre on the UWI Campus, St. Augustine Trinidad.

New Playwright’s Workshop

This is a year-long gathering where playwrights can share new and developing work. No matter how experienced or how ‘green’ the playwright, one thing is for certain: all are welcome. This nurturing and warm environment provides the perfect catalyst for budding playwrights to start breaking through onto Trinidad’s theater scene. Through discussion, script reading, critique and constructive feedback, playwrights are given a chance to share their work and their ideas, while being guided by the best. The public is welcome to sit into workshops as well, and share in the ideas being posited.

Playwrights and attending actors read through the roles, bringing them to life in a casual, learning environment. Workshop participants will engage in productive critique and feedback on each body of work. (Trinidad Theatre Workshop)

If you’d like to sit in to one of these workshops, clear the first Wednesday in every month. Workshops are held at the Trinidad Theatre Workshop in St. Claire in Port of Spain, Trinidad.

New Play Festival

Finally, Trinidad’s New Play Festival is upon us! This  is usually held in November, however this year you’ll be able to see original scripts being performed as part of the New Play Festival. After playwrights go through the Playwright’s Workshop, they are given funding, and paired with a director. From start to finish, they work with actors towards the realization of their script on stage. It is truly a humbling experience to see the finished work on stage at the end!

The New Play Festival will be held from 6-9 December 2018 will feature workshop performances of three plays: Earl Lovelace’s Salt, Narad Mahabir’s The Ford and Rhesa Samuel’s Asylum.

The festival, now int its third year, aims to foster the development of original storytelling through drama and playmaking, provide opportunities for new plays and indigenous storytelling to be performed for personal and collective development. The festival also provides an opportunity for theatre practitioners of varying generations to work together, and a forum to raise awareness of local theatre works, inspiring appreciation, respect and support for local theatre. (T&T Newsday)

If you think you’re up for this, visit the Big Black Box, 33 Murray Street, Woodbrook. Make sure to book your tickets in advance!

Christmas In October – Shop Local!

Christmas junkies of T&T – rejoice for it is October! Forget Halloween, forget thanksgiving, forget whatever other American tradition that has trickled down to our little island. We’ve only got 70-something days until Christmas!

And, you know what that means, right? Christmas light will slowly but surely be nailed, hung, and strung from every post and banister, radio stations will be torn between playing parang or the latest Soca releases for Carnival 2019 and everyone and their uncle will be studying exactly 3 things:

  • what color to paint their houses,
  • which stores have sales on curtains and
  • where they should hide their ‘good rum’ when families inevitable show up unannounced.

In Trinidad, the entire year is often mistaken for one, big, long public holiday with paid days off popping up almost every month of the year. This year however, October to our horror and dismay has no public holidays; and while I’m sure many Trinis are experiencing increased levels of holiday-tabanka at the thought of having to work for 4 weeks straight, others (like myself) have decided to start Christmas festivities extra early.


Over the past few years many artisan markets have popped up in Trinidad which offer patrons a whimsical and relaxed alternative to rushing around at the mall for presents. Now, I don’t know about you, but strolling from stall to stall laden with locally made art, cosmetics, food (of course), handbags and clothes is a much-needed escape from the hustle and headache that Christmas shopping usually brings. The innovation, warmth and dedication that these local entrepreneurs bring to patrons is unparalleled.

Here are a few of our top pics! Shop local this Christmas – you won’t regret it.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

(Source: ThingsTT & UpMarket)

 

  1. UpMarket – Home to various locations in Port-of-Spain, UpMarket is a staple for local crafts, food and unique finds. In the past they’ve hopped around to a few locations with both indoor and open-air options. To name a few locations, UpMarket has had pop-ups at NAPA (the National Academy of Performing Arts), the Trinidad and Tobago Country Club and the Woodbrook Youth Facility. No matter the location though, this market is always packed, so arrive early and follow their social media pages to find out when you can visit next!
  2. ThingsTT – This pop-up artisan market is most often found at the J.F.K. Auditorium at our very own University of the West Indies in St. Augustine Trinidad. The auditorium is very spacious and fully air-conditioned so you can browse in leisure. It’s free entry, with the entire University’s grounds open to the public. You can shop around at the auditorium and have some outdoor family fun with the family all in one! While it’s usually a smaller setup than UpMarket, you’ll definitely get your fill of local vendors.
  3. South Market – With a trip down the highway, you’ll find South Market: an open air set-up on the Naparima Boys’ College grounds in San Fernando. This market boasts of over 80 local merchants and draws crowds from all over the country. Arrive early to secure parking on the premises and we guarantee you won’t be disappointed.
  4. Bits and Pieces – This market pops up at the glamorous conference room at Movie Towne, Invaders Bay, Port of Spain and often carries higher-end artisan vendors. From wood crafts to artisan chocolates, local painters and designers, an entire section dedicated to local food and Christmas delicacies to hand crafted jewelry – Bits and Pieces will has something special for you.

Zaboca Season: A Trini Obsession

All year long the eager people of Trinidad and Tobago wait for it. They dream of it, they yearn for it. Spending every waking moment counting the months until its time; eyeing-down every vendor’s table for those glorious green globes of goodness.

Its creamy, silky texture; its smooth, sultry taste. The perfect addition to any plate of pelau, layered atop warm toast, or on its own – chopped with a dash of salt and black pepper. It’s a wonderful season of parties in the street and birdsongs filling the air. Not to mention the long, lingering stares and instant envy when you realize your neighbour has a tree; or your friend got one from his aunty’s daughter’s friend’s grandmother because they didn’t want it to ‘overripe’ and waste. Don’t even say it – you had a zaboca and let it spoil!? You’re sure to be exiled from the island altogether.

Or the ‘piper’ in town who selling it for $50/lb and despite the instant gripe and ‘cold-sweat’ you get, you still buy it because ‘is whole year ah waiting for dis’! Forget Carnival – it’s Zaboca Season ah living for!

And you know, every Trini is an expert – on EVERYTHING. So be grateful! For once, every tanty, aunty and granny with stop hounding you about the ‘nice young man’ they have to set you up with and instead, for three months out of the year all you will hear is ‘wrap it in guardian paper’ because apparently it will ‘ripe faster’.

All of a sudden everyone’s life revolves around it. Trinis will eat, sleep and breathe Zaboca and if you didn’t know already: YES, Zaboca-Tabanka is a real thing!

Pssst – Check out our post about Trini Slang if you can’t keep up!

It’s a wonderful time of year indeed: Zaboca Season! And if you don’t like it – then you ‘muss be mad’. Bess yuh take ah LIAT plane to another island for the next few months because basically yuh just offend 90% of the island.

The Trini obsession with zaboca, or fondly known by many ‘in foreign’ as avocado, can be described as nothing short of complicated. Quite frankly Trini people fall into some kind of Zaboca Bazodee. Young boys scale walls to ‘teif’ from trees, friends and relatives start to hoard all produce they can find, relationships break up in fiery arguments on the street, people who you never thought would deceive you, start to lie through their teeth!

“Me? I have zaboca? No! That’s just a…really big lime”

Love it or hate it you can’t deny, all around the globe zaboca is a delicacy. It’s simple, yet so complex. The rich yet subtle flavour of our local zaboca makes this the best addition to any meal. Often Trini food can be laden with flavour and spice. Balanced by the zaboca’s  unique, mild flavour, it cools any meal, without overwhelming the taste buds. And let’s not forget its nutritious value!

So next time you’re on our little island look out for a tree. Buy one, borrow one, beg for one. You can’t miss out! Check out this Caribbean Recipe for Zaboca Choka, also known as guacamole or avocado dip (source: Caribbean Pot). Let us know what you think and share recipes in the comments on how you like to eat your zaboca.

Your Guide to Trini Slang

221c79d6347a86a8e60571108cf6d27dSo you’ve landed in sunny T&T, were met by who many call “the happiest people on earth”, but you can’t quite figure out what’s being said. Good news, you’re not alone.

In Trinidad and Tobago, many different dialects are spoken. Caribbean Standard English is spoken by many, but mostly in a formal or academic setting. What you’ll encounter most however, is Trinidadian English Creole – a style of talking that merges African, French, Spanish and English twangs, born from our nation’s multicultural history.

Trinidad and Tobago, for those who’d like a bit of history, has undergone many voluntary and forced migratory processes that have led to the island’s rich and diverse population characteristics and hybridized language dialects.

From Spanish, French, Dutch and British colonizers to African slavery, to the migration of Indian, Chinese and Portuguese during post-emancipation, indentureship schemes, one thing is for certain:

Our tiny islands have been shaped many different races, religions, cultures, ethnicity and their respective languages so much so that it is almost impossible to separate the modern-day manifestations of these influences, from each other.

So what you might hear when you’re browsing through the hustle and bustle on the streets of Port-of-Spain, or when you visit the Tunapuna market for some local meats and vegetables will be far removed, and much more unique from what you might be accustomed to.

Communicating with Trinis has the potential to leave you spellbound or completely and utterly confused – so let us help you out!

Here are a few Trini sayings or slang terms and phrases that you may encounter and their “Standard English” translations/definitions.


Bacchanal (n)

  • Pronunciation: bah-can-ah-l
  • Trini Use: “Ey, I have a bacchanal to tell yuh”; “That party had too much bacchanal”
  • Translation: drama, scandal, confusion; someone who likes drama, scandal or confusion.

Bacchanalist (adj)

  • Pronunciation: bah-can-ah-l-ist
  • Trini Use: “She/He is a real baccanalist”
  • Translation: someone who likes to cause, or being the center of drama, scandal or confusion.

Back chat (n, v)

  • Pronunciation: bah-c ch-ah-t
  • Trini Use: “Don’t back chat me”, “You know better than to back chat the teacher”
  • Translation: to reply a rude remark to a figure of authority (usually a child to an adult), an insolent response

Broughtupsy (n)

  • Pronunciation: br-or-t-up-see
  • Trini Use: “Yuh have no broughtupsy or what?”, “Dem children have no broughtupsee”
  • Translation: to have good behavior, to have manners , or have decorum

Chinksin (v)

  • Pronunciation: ch-ink-s-in
  • Trini Use: “Oh gosh, how yuh chinksin so”, “Come now, don’t chinks me”
  • Translation: to be miserly, to distribute less than one could, to be selfish (usually used when referring to the distribution of food)

Hoss (n)

  • Pronunciation: h-or-s
  • Trini Use: “Ey hoss…”
  • Translation: refers to a friend

Lime (n, v)

  • Pronunciation: l-ime
  • Trini Use: “You liming this weekend?”, “I having a lime, home by me”
  • Translation: a party, to hang out, a casual get-together

Fete (n, v)

  • Pronunciation: f-eh-t
  • Trini Use: “You going that fete?”, “That fete was real vibes”, “We feting”
  • Translation: a party, a public function usually held outdoors that usually has entertainment

Maco (n, v, adj)

  • Pronunciation: mah-co
  • Trini Use: “Stop macoing the people business”, “You are such a maco”, “That girl could maco!”
  • Translation: someone who likes to know other people’s business, to listen into someone else’s conversation, to eavesdrop or spy on someone

Mamaguy (n)

  • Pronunciation: mah-mah-g-ah-y
  • Trini Use: “You rel like mamaguy eh”, “She/He only mamaguying yuh”
  • Translation: to ridicule, to flatter or deceive by flattery, to make fun of by complimenting.

Parlour (n)

  • Pronunciation: pah-l-uh
  • Trini Use: “Check by the parlour and see if you get”, “The parlour was closed”
  • Translation: a small shop usually situated on the roadside

Tabanca (n)

  • Pronunciation: tah-ban-kah
  • Trini Use: “I have a tabanca”, “Why you being so? You have a tabanca or what?”
  • Translation: heartbreak, depression after the breakup of a relationship

Vaps (n)

  • Pronunciation: v-ah-ps
  • Trini Use: “I catch a vaps and went to the beach yesterday”
  • Translation: a sudden move, a spontaneous decision

Vibes (adj)

  • Pronunciation: v-ibe-s
  • Trini Use: “That party had rel vibes”
  • Translation: good spirits, festivities, very fun and enjoyable

D Other Day

  • Trini Use: “You know, that happened to me d other day!”, “Yes I see her d other day”
  • Translation: a period of time, not an accurate representation of events, can encompass a time in the past that may vary in days, months or years.

Dong D Road

  • Trini Use: “I going dong d road”, “I going by the parlour dong d road”
  • Translation: a place, not an accurate representation of where a person is, or where they are going, refers to an area that is in fairly close proximity to the user’s current location.

Doh Study It

  • Trini Use: “Here na, doh study it”, “I not studyin dat”
  • Translation: I am not doing to let that bother me, You shouldn’t let that bother you.

Waz D Scene?

  • Trini Use: “Ey, was d scene?”
  • Translation: a general greeting; What’s up?, How are you?, How are things going?

Like ting

  • Trini Use: “You like ting eh!”
  • Translation: usually said in jest or playfully; to enjoy drama, to be mischievous

Jeez-an-ages!

  • Trini Use: “Jeez-an-ages, you serious!?”
  • Translation: used in any context that requires an exclamation, used to show surprise, exasperation, annoyance.

You fuh real? or Yuh makin joke!

  • Trini Use: “You fuh real? She do that?”, “Yuh makin joke, these people not easy”
  • Translation: used to verify or to question a statement, used to express disbelief; “Are you serious?”, “Are you joking?”

Yuh fadda is a glass maker?

  • Trini Use: as is
  • Translation: used to express annoyance that someone is blocking you view; “You’re blocking”, “Can you move aside?.

Guys, the list can go on and on. So there you have it – just a few Trini slang terms and saying that you might encounter while on our beautiful island. You’ll definitely come across some that are not on our list – so if you’re confused, ask a question!

Until next time! See our homepage for a direct link for booking your stay with us.

 

Hidden Beaches of Trinidad & Tobago

Lately we’ve been exploring the road less taken – literally. If you know anything about Trinidad and Tobago then you’ve heard the words “Maracas Beach” and “Pigeon Point Beach” one too many times. It’s kind of a “been there, done that” scenario for many guests who return to our beautiful island.

So we’ve been thinking. Let’s say you want some of that signature sun, sea, and sand, but also want a new experience – what do you do? We’ve got it: Keep Reading. First Capital Apartment has just what you need: a guide to T&T’s Hidden beaches.

1. Hundred Steps Beach, La Fillet (Trinidad)

You’ve decided to take a trip to Maracas Beach for some Bake and Shark – this is a must. But let’s spice things up even more! Keep driving along the North Coast Road, pass Las Cuevas (one of our all time favourite, but not so hidden beaches) and you’ll find a secluded oasis.

Hundred Steps Beach truly a gem and boasts of crystal clear waters, silky-smooth sand and all the makings of a drool-worthy Instagram feed.

But don’t take our word for it, check out what Destination TT has to say about it!

Situated at the base of a cliff, the beach is accessed via a short nature walk from Mitchell Trace to the top of a concrete staircase that leads to the beach. [Despite the name] a section of the staircase is missing and the completing your descent requires a climb done a rope tied to a tree.

But once you are passed the adventurous scramble down the cliff, you realize that this is a destination worth the effort getting to. You are greeted by a lovely beach comprised of fine golden sand with a gorgeous view of the Chupara Bay to the front and enclosed by rocks on either end.

The tranquil nature of the beach is a privilege to behold and you realize that you are experiencing something that few others have. 

Hundred Steps Beach great for tourists who need to “unplug”. Enjoy sun bathing, swimming, exploring, snorkeling – you name it! We advise that you go in groups due to the how secluded this beach is. Safety first!

2. Pirate’s Bay, Charlotteville (Tobago)

pirate-s-bay-view-fromLet’s hop over to our better half, Tobago, for a bit. For the ultimate beach-goer, if you love Trinidad you’ll REALLY love Tobago.

Charlotteville is a small fishing village located on the northern side of Tobago. Here’s where the adventure starts: Pirate’s Bay is only accessible via foot or boat.

 

Named after the shelter that it provided to marauding buccaneers three centuries ago, this charming and isolated bay and beach is the [archetypal] deserted island beach and was used extensively in the original Robinson Crusoe filmed in 1952. (Visit Tobago)

Those walking from the town center can take a footpath and a concrete staircase all the way to the water’s edge. It’s only a 20-minute trek – so strap in and embrace the trek. On a sunny day, expect some sweat! But that makes the cool embrace of the emerald-green water all the more worth it, right?

Shoes or sandals can be worn for this walk, and make sure and pack some water, fruits and light refreshments for when you’re lounging. There aren’t any shops or vendors nearby so be prepared!

Chances are when you arrive, you’ll be the only ones there despite some boats being anchored off shore. For this hidden beach, we’d definitely recommend you go with a group – having company is not only more fun, but it’s also safer.3.

3. Gasparee Caves & Bombshell Bay

You know it’s on when the beach is called “Bombshell” – just saying. But for those who need more convincing, let’s break it down. You’ve got to do this one in phases so make it a whole-day affair!

Make sure you book a tour however because this on is definitely not a DIY adventure.  Here’s a link to book a tour on the Chaguaramas Development Authority (CDA) Website – support locally trained guides and get the best bang for you buck.

Boat Ride Anyone?

Start with a 10-minute scenic boat ride from Chaguaramas where you can relax as the cool Caribbean breeze envelopes your trip up the islands off the North West coast of Trinidad. Boats will take you to Gaspar Grande, a small island off the coast where your adventure will begin.

Get your shoes on, it’s time for a Hike!

Jump off that boat and get going. It’ll take you just 25 minutes to get to the caves. Be careful, and stay hydrated as this trek is fairly steep. We know you’re a pro though, you’ll get there in no time! Once you go with a guide you’ll be briefed on all the history of the region and a few fun facts about the islands.

thumbnail60-990x660Bruce Wayne? Nope, but it’s still a pretty cool Cave.

Gasparee Cave can be entered from the top, and visitors can begin their descent down a metal staircase which leads to the eye-catching and enthralling cave system, 100 feet below. It’s a geographer’s paradise: with eerie limestone formations, sinkholes and a shimmering, glassy pool. You won’t be able to get enough of the array of colours.

Finally: Beach Time.

Once you’ve booked in with a tour, you can then leave by boat and zip off to Bombshell Bay on the Eastern side of the island. There you’ll find a private beach, salt water swimming pool and changing rooms. Relax on the golden sands and take a dip in the salt water. You’ll be able to purchase drink and food right there, so no worries!

End your day with the smooth, silky embrace of a Trini sunset.


So which will you choose? Let us know. Guests of First Capital Apartments will be given assistance to plan any excursion they like through out network of trained guides and taxi drivers – you name it and we’ll make a recommendation.

See our homepage for a direct link for booking your stay with us.

Best Street-Food Hubs in Trinidad!

We blogged all about our top food picks near to First Capital Apartments but did you know that Trinidad is home to some major food strips, where the best in street-food can be found?

The island is home to a rich variety of races, creeds and nationalities which bring with it a myriad of cuisine options and hybrids! So without further ado, here are some of the islands most popular food strips and street food hubs where you can enjoy casual night-dining in the cool, crisp Caribbean air.

1. Open-Air Food Court:

Around the world famous Queen’s Park Savannah lies our first food hub. In the heart of our nation’s capital, Port-of-Spain, you’ll find the best in  Trinbagonian cuisine cooked by the very best: our very own Trini People. Who better than to cook good, old-fashioned Trini food, than the beautiful and passionate people of the island! You’ll find tons of variety here.

Hungry? Try some corn soup, some spicy souse or tender barbecued pig tails. Eat a whole fried fish or bake and shark – there’s no need to share. Thirsty? You’ll be happy to find freshly squeezed juices, punches of all varieties and tastes and for the kids – get a snow cone oozing with extra condensed milk!

You’ll even find cuisine from around the Caribbean with tastes of Jamaica and Barbados making an appearance. After all, we are one family – so join in the fun! Arrive at about 6:00pm, walk with some beach chairs or pop open the trunk and have a feast under the stars! You won’t regret it.

2. The Cross:

Let’s move down South, to “The Cross”, famously known in Trinidad for its band of food trucks. Roadside eating never looked to good! You’ll find trucks of all shapes an sizes ready and prepped to serve you.

Located in San Fernando, Trinidad, The Cross is mostly known for its burgers but recently its become home to gyros, loaded hot dogs, corn soup, tacos – you name it! Parking is available on the strip itself, and there’s plenty of space to stand and eat, or simple stop with some friends for a grab and go dinner. It’s truly a must-see for any true foodie with its mixture of local and international cuisine. Thanks to our multicultural society, don’t be surprised if you find some franken-food that blends many foreign delicacies with a twist of Trinbagonian flare and flavour.

3. Ariapita Avenue

Possibly one of the most popular “liming” strips in Trinidad, Ariapita Avenue is an extremely popular location in Trinidadian street food. The stretch of road is home to night clubs, fine dining restaurants and a wide range of street food. Here you’ll find doubles, gyros, burgers, Trini home-style fried chicken, local artisan pizza, waffles and even Chinese fast-food, with a local twist. You can part and walk down the street easily, but with weekends getting particularly busy, beware of were you park! Wreckers are always on the prowl to be sure to check street signs to ensure that you’re parking in a safe zone.

AA.PNG

4. Grand Bazaar Food Strip

Unofficially named due to its close proximity to the Grand Bazaar Mall, this food strip has become increasing popular over the years. With highlights of local and international cuisine, you’ll be able to find bits of Colombian, Syrian and Mexican food options here along with the good, old Trini bites. The area has been newly renovated with seating options for those who wish to park and have a bite with family or friends. The street can get extremely busy however, during peak weekend hours, so be vigilant at all times. Vendors are usually open from about lunch time, but if you want the true experience, come for dinner when the street comes alive with lights and laughter. You won’t regret it!

So there you have it – just a few options for night life eating. Trinidad is such a diverse island, it’ll be a shame if you visited and didn’t pop by at least one of these epic locations.

Contact First Capital Apartments for more information on how we can meet your accommodation needs! Drop us an email, or give us a call – all the information can be found on our “Contact Us” page. We’re here to care of you, so don’t hesitate to get in touch.

T&T Tours: Top Religious Sites

As we emerge from the holy week of Easter, citizens of Trinidad and Tobago return to their places of work, their schools, their everyday lives wishing for just one more day added to an already lengthy, long weekend.

Many know our twin-island republic as a “Fete Nation”. We’re known internationally as the party capital of the Caribbean, with endless parties revolving around Carnival, throughout the year. And don’t get me wrong, Carnival is a integral part of our heritage, our way of life, our culture – but it’s not the only thing we’re known for.

Trinidad and Tobago, due to various historical processes has undergone shifts and evolution in culture over hundreds of years of conquest and colonization. Intertwined with the passing of rule over many decades and mass immigration processes such as slavery and indentureship, our Twin islands has grown into what can only be described as a religious melting-pot, an oasis of cultural diversity, a hub of religious tolerance and acceptance.

The largest religious groups are the Protestant Christians (including Anglicans, Presbyterians, Methodist, Evangelicals, Pentecostals and Baptist), Roman Catholic Christians, Hindus, and Muslims.

Two Afro-Caribbean syncretic faiths, the Shouter or Spiritual Baptists and the Orisha faith (formerly called Shangos) are among the fastest growing religious groups.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (known as “Mormons”) has also expanded its presence in the country since late-1970s.

According to the 2011 Census, 33.4% of the population was Protestant (including 12.0% Pentecostal, 5.7% Anglican, 4.1% Seventh-day Adventist, 3.0% Presbyterian or Congregational, 1.2% Baptist, and 0.1% Methodist), 21.5% was Roman Catholic, 18.1% was Hindu, and 5% was Muslim.

A small number of individuals subscribed to traditional Caribbean religions with African roots, such as the Spiritual Baptists (sometimes called Shouter Baptists) (5.7%); and the Orisha (0.1%). The smaller groups were Jehovah’s Witnesses (1.5%) and unaffiliated (2.2%). There is also a small Buddhist community on the island.

So we’re encouraging our guests, and any tourists visiting Trinidad and Tobago to take the road less travelling. Step away from the sun, sea and sand for a moment and take a tour of our islands most prominent religious sites. You need to be affiliated with any of these religions to appreciate the rich cultural and religious diversity that exists on our islands.

1. The Temple in the Sea

This unique site is located in Waterloo, Trinidad. A symbol of resistance and built out of the desire to retain his religious culture, Siewdass Sadhu is the visionary behind this noble creation. After being jailed for building a similar temple on government owned sugarcane lands, this Indian indentured labourer decided that if he could not build his temple on land, then he would build it in the sea. It is said that Sadhu laid each brick himself, carrying the the materials he needed to build his temple on his bicycle. Laying each stone, he forged a path forward in spite of both public and government skepticism.

The temple, simple and stoic, sits on the shores at Waterloo, a defiant symbol of innovation, hope and serenity. It stands strong, as evidence of what human being can achieve despite their faith being challenged.

2. The Holy Trinity Cathedral

For those yearning for a trip back in time, to our island’s days under British colonial rule, this is a must-see. There are many magnificent cathedrals in our capital, Port of Spain, however of them, these are definitely in our top three! Built to reflect the Gothic style architecture of the Victorian Era, this Anglican church was built in 1809, by patronage of the British Parliament. TnT_PoS_Cathedral_of_the_Holy_Trinity_(back_view)

The magnificent hammer-beam roof is made of local wood and characterized by huge trusses. The altar is built entirely of selected local mahogany and backed by alabaster and marble mounted on a base of Portland stone. The stained glass windows showcase magnificent representations of the saints. The Cathedral is filled with interesting historical items such as the marble statue dedicated to former Governor and founder of the Church, Sir Ralph Woodford. Along the walls inside the Cathedral are Tablets placed “in the memory of” former members of the British elite of colonial days.

Source: Buzz TT

 

 

3. Moravian Churches, Tobago.

Moravian-Church-in-the-vi-010.jpgLet’s head over to Tobago! Spring Garden and Black Rock are two important villages for those seeking a bit of history about colonial Tobago. Early Moravian missionaries constructed two churches, in 1852 and 1859 respectively. These humble buildings are almost identical yet in their simplicity, these chapels are remarkable for their design. Each building incorporates wood-shingle walls and hipped roofs, resting on a foundation of coral limestone. These Moravian churches were bastions of colonial Tobago and their primary function was in ministering to plantation slaves and educating their children during pre-Emancipation times. Adding to their historical significance is the fact that these churches were two of the few structures that survived devastating Hurricane Flora that affected our twin-islands in 1963.

4. 85ft Lord Hanuman Statue

This is one for the record books! Many do not know, but Trinidad is home to the largest Hanuman murti outside of India. Built according to the Dravidian style of architecture of South India this 85-foot tall statue of the Hindu god, Lord Hanuman located in the village of Carapichaima, Trinidad.

A “murti” in Hindu culture is any embodiment of the divine. It refers to any embodiment, manifestation, incarnation or personification of a spiritual entity or deity. Worshiped by many who wish to gain courage and strength in their lives, Lord Hanuman is probably one of the most celebrated and revered figures in the Hindu Mythology.

The towering murti took years to design and construct and the result is truly a sight to behold – but don’t take our word for it. Check out this video!

5. Mohammed Ali Jinnah Memorial Mosque

tem

Source: The Trinidad Guardian

Finally, we couldn’t end without shining the spotlight on First Capital Apartment’s very own home – The Town of St. Joseph. Located just minutes away from our wonderful apartments is a majestic remnant of the island’s Muslim followers.

One of Trinidad’s finest mosques, which serves as headquarters of the Trinidad Muslim League. It is also regarded as one of the 50 most beautiful buildings in the world. It’s tall towers can be seen from the nearby main road. During the holy season of Ramadhan, many Muslim brothers and sisters gather to break their fasting daily, and on any given day residents and visitors to the area can hear the iconic call to worship as it echoes through the town.


So there you have it! These are just some of the many religious sites found in and around Trinidad and Tobago. If you find the time to venture away from the ordinary, take a moment to see the extra-ordinary. Dive into our rich culture, and experience a religious tour around the islands.

There’s lots to see but be on your best behavior! Our national is built on love, respect and unity in spite of diversity. So regardless of your religious affiliation, when visiting the different religious sites around Trinidad and Tobago, we ask that all who yearn for knowledge and understanding, also be gracious and respectful to both the sites and the people who you encounter on your journey.

For reservation inquiries and help planning your religious tour around Trinidad and Tobago, please send us an email. Check out the homepage for a direct message portal!