Hidden Beaches of Trinidad & Tobago

Lately we’ve been exploring the road less taken – literally. If you know anything about Trinidad and Tobago then you’ve heard the words “Maracas Beach” and “Pigeon Point Beach” one too many times. It’s kind of a “been there, done that” scenario for many guests who return to our beautiful island.

So we’ve been thinking. Let’s say you want some of that signature sun, sea, and sand, but also want a new experience – what do you do? We’ve got it: Keep Reading. First Capital Apartment has just what you need: a guide to T&T’s Hidden beaches.

1. Hundred Steps Beach, La Fillet (Trinidad)

You’ve decided to take a trip to Maracas Beach for some Bake and Shark – this is a must. But let’s spice things up even more! Keep driving along the North Coast Road, pass Las Cuevas (one of our all time favourite, but not so hidden beaches) and you’ll find a secluded oasis.

Hundred Steps Beach truly a gem and boasts of crystal clear waters, silky-smooth sand and all the makings of a drool-worthy Instagram feed.

But don’t take our word for it, check out what Destination TT has to say about it!

Situated at the base of a cliff, the beach is accessed via a short nature walk from Mitchell Trace to the top of a concrete staircase that leads to the beach. [Despite the name] a section of the staircase is missing and the completing your descent requires a climb done a rope tied to a tree.

But once you are passed the adventurous scramble down the cliff, you realize that this is a destination worth the effort getting to. You are greeted by a lovely beach comprised of fine golden sand with a gorgeous view of the Chupara Bay to the front and enclosed by rocks on either end.

The tranquil nature of the beach is a privilege to behold and you realize that you are experiencing something that few others have. 

Hundred Steps Beach great for tourists who need to “unplug”. Enjoy sun bathing, swimming, exploring, snorkeling – you name it! We advise that you go in groups due to the how secluded this beach is. Safety first!

2. Pirate’s Bay, Charlotteville (Tobago)

pirate-s-bay-view-fromLet’s hop over to our better half, Tobago, for a bit. For the ultimate beach-goer, if you love Trinidad you’ll REALLY love Tobago.

Charlotteville is a small fishing village located on the northern side of Tobago. Here’s where the adventure starts: Pirate’s Bay is only accessible via foot or boat.

 

Named after the shelter that it provided to marauding buccaneers three centuries ago, this charming and isolated bay and beach is the [archetypal] deserted island beach and was used extensively in the original Robinson Crusoe filmed in 1952. (Visit Tobago)

Those walking from the town center can take a footpath and a concrete staircase all the way to the water’s edge. It’s only a 20-minute trek – so strap in and embrace the trek. On a sunny day, expect some sweat! But that makes the cool embrace of the emerald-green water all the more worth it, right?

Shoes or sandals can be worn for this walk, and make sure and pack some water, fruits and light refreshments for when you’re lounging. There aren’t any shops or vendors nearby so be prepared!

Chances are when you arrive, you’ll be the only ones there despite some boats being anchored off shore. For this hidden beach, we’d definitely recommend you go with a group – having company is not only more fun, but it’s also safer.3.

3. Gasparee Caves & Bombshell Bay

You know it’s on when the beach is called “Bombshell” – just saying. But for those who need more convincing, let’s break it down. You’ve got to do this one in phases so make it a whole-day affair!

Make sure you book a tour however because this on is definitely not a DIY adventure.  Here’s a link to book a tour on the Chaguaramas Development Authority (CDA) Website – support locally trained guides and get the best bang for you buck.

Boat Ride Anyone?

Start with a 10-minute scenic boat ride from Chaguaramas where you can relax as the cool Caribbean breeze envelopes your trip up the islands off the North West coast of Trinidad. Boats will take you to Gaspar Grande, a small island off the coast where your adventure will begin.

Get your shoes on, it’s time for a Hike!

Jump off that boat and get going. It’ll take you just 25 minutes to get to the caves. Be careful, and stay hydrated as this trek is fairly steep. We know you’re a pro though, you’ll get there in no time! Once you go with a guide you’ll be briefed on all the history of the region and a few fun facts about the islands.

thumbnail60-990x660Bruce Wayne? Nope, but it’s still a pretty cool Cave.

Gasparee Cave can be entered from the top, and visitors can begin their descent down a metal staircase which leads to the eye-catching and enthralling cave system, 100 feet below. It’s a geographer’s paradise: with eerie limestone formations, sinkholes and a shimmering, glassy pool. You won’t be able to get enough of the array of colours.

Finally: Beach Time.

Once you’ve booked in with a tour, you can then leave by boat and zip off to Bombshell Bay on the Eastern side of the island. There you’ll find a private beach, salt water swimming pool and changing rooms. Relax on the golden sands and take a dip in the salt water. You’ll be able to purchase drink and food right there, so no worries!

End your day with the smooth, silky embrace of a Trini sunset.


So which will you choose? Let us know. Guests of First Capital Apartments will be given assistance to plan any excursion they like through out network of trained guides and taxi drivers – you name it and we’ll make a recommendation.

See our homepage for a direct link for booking your stay with us.

T&T Tours: Top Religious Sites

As we emerge from the holy week of Easter, citizens of Trinidad and Tobago return to their places of work, their schools, their everyday lives wishing for just one more day added to an already lengthy, long weekend.

Many know our twin-island republic as a “Fete Nation”. We’re known internationally as the party capital of the Caribbean, with endless parties revolving around Carnival, throughout the year. And don’t get me wrong, Carnival is a integral part of our heritage, our way of life, our culture – but it’s not the only thing we’re known for.

Trinidad and Tobago, due to various historical processes has undergone shifts and evolution in culture over hundreds of years of conquest and colonization. Intertwined with the passing of rule over many decades and mass immigration processes such as slavery and indentureship, our Twin islands has grown into what can only be described as a religious melting-pot, an oasis of cultural diversity, a hub of religious tolerance and acceptance.

The largest religious groups are the Protestant Christians (including Anglicans, Presbyterians, Methodist, Evangelicals, Pentecostals and Baptist), Roman Catholic Christians, Hindus, and Muslims.

Two Afro-Caribbean syncretic faiths, the Shouter or Spiritual Baptists and the Orisha faith (formerly called Shangos) are among the fastest growing religious groups.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (known as “Mormons”) has also expanded its presence in the country since late-1970s.

According to the 2011 Census, 33.4% of the population was Protestant (including 12.0% Pentecostal, 5.7% Anglican, 4.1% Seventh-day Adventist, 3.0% Presbyterian or Congregational, 1.2% Baptist, and 0.1% Methodist), 21.5% was Roman Catholic, 18.1% was Hindu, and 5% was Muslim.

A small number of individuals subscribed to traditional Caribbean religions with African roots, such as the Spiritual Baptists (sometimes called Shouter Baptists) (5.7%); and the Orisha (0.1%). The smaller groups were Jehovah’s Witnesses (1.5%) and unaffiliated (2.2%). There is also a small Buddhist community on the island.

So we’re encouraging our guests, and any tourists visiting Trinidad and Tobago to take the road less travelling. Step away from the sun, sea and sand for a moment and take a tour of our islands most prominent religious sites. You need to be affiliated with any of these religions to appreciate the rich cultural and religious diversity that exists on our islands.

1. The Temple in the Sea

This unique site is located in Waterloo, Trinidad. A symbol of resistance and built out of the desire to retain his religious culture, Siewdass Sadhu is the visionary behind this noble creation. After being jailed for building a similar temple on government owned sugarcane lands, this Indian indentured labourer decided that if he could not build his temple on land, then he would build it in the sea. It is said that Sadhu laid each brick himself, carrying the the materials he needed to build his temple on his bicycle. Laying each stone, he forged a path forward in spite of both public and government skepticism.

The temple, simple and stoic, sits on the shores at Waterloo, a defiant symbol of innovation, hope and serenity. It stands strong, as evidence of what human being can achieve despite their faith being challenged.

2. The Holy Trinity Cathedral

For those yearning for a trip back in time, to our island’s days under British colonial rule, this is a must-see. There are many magnificent cathedrals in our capital, Port of Spain, however of them, these are definitely in our top three! Built to reflect the Gothic style architecture of the Victorian Era, this Anglican church was built in 1809, by patronage of the British Parliament. TnT_PoS_Cathedral_of_the_Holy_Trinity_(back_view)

The magnificent hammer-beam roof is made of local wood and characterized by huge trusses. The altar is built entirely of selected local mahogany and backed by alabaster and marble mounted on a base of Portland stone. The stained glass windows showcase magnificent representations of the saints. The Cathedral is filled with interesting historical items such as the marble statue dedicated to former Governor and founder of the Church, Sir Ralph Woodford. Along the walls inside the Cathedral are Tablets placed “in the memory of” former members of the British elite of colonial days.

Source: Buzz TT

 

 

3. Moravian Churches, Tobago.

Moravian-Church-in-the-vi-010.jpgLet’s head over to Tobago! Spring Garden and Black Rock are two important villages for those seeking a bit of history about colonial Tobago. Early Moravian missionaries constructed two churches, in 1852 and 1859 respectively. These humble buildings are almost identical yet in their simplicity, these chapels are remarkable for their design. Each building incorporates wood-shingle walls and hipped roofs, resting on a foundation of coral limestone. These Moravian churches were bastions of colonial Tobago and their primary function was in ministering to plantation slaves and educating their children during pre-Emancipation times. Adding to their historical significance is the fact that these churches were two of the few structures that survived devastating Hurricane Flora that affected our twin-islands in 1963.

4. 85ft Lord Hanuman Statue

This is one for the record books! Many do not know, but Trinidad is home to the largest Hanuman murti outside of India. Built according to the Dravidian style of architecture of South India this 85-foot tall statue of the Hindu god, Lord Hanuman located in the village of Carapichaima, Trinidad.

A “murti” in Hindu culture is any embodiment of the divine. It refers to any embodiment, manifestation, incarnation or personification of a spiritual entity or deity. Worshiped by many who wish to gain courage and strength in their lives, Lord Hanuman is probably one of the most celebrated and revered figures in the Hindu Mythology.

The towering murti took years to design and construct and the result is truly a sight to behold – but don’t take our word for it. Check out this video!

5. Mohammed Ali Jinnah Memorial Mosque

tem

Source: The Trinidad Guardian

Finally, we couldn’t end without shining the spotlight on First Capital Apartment’s very own home – The Town of St. Joseph. Located just minutes away from our wonderful apartments is a majestic remnant of the island’s Muslim followers.

One of Trinidad’s finest mosques, which serves as headquarters of the Trinidad Muslim League. It is also regarded as one of the 50 most beautiful buildings in the world. It’s tall towers can be seen from the nearby main road. During the holy season of Ramadhan, many Muslim brothers and sisters gather to break their fasting daily, and on any given day residents and visitors to the area can hear the iconic call to worship as it echoes through the town.


So there you have it! These are just some of the many religious sites found in and around Trinidad and Tobago. If you find the time to venture away from the ordinary, take a moment to see the extra-ordinary. Dive into our rich culture, and experience a religious tour around the islands.

There’s lots to see but be on your best behavior! Our national is built on love, respect and unity in spite of diversity. So regardless of your religious affiliation, when visiting the different religious sites around Trinidad and Tobago, we ask that all who yearn for knowledge and understanding, also be gracious and respectful to both the sites and the people who you encounter on your journey.

For reservation inquiries and help planning your religious tour around Trinidad and Tobago, please send us an email. Check out the homepage for a direct message portal!